-0.1 C
New York
Thursday, February 29, 2024

World’s first Vagina Museum sacked from premises

The world’s first vagina museum is closing this week after being asked to leave the premises.

The world’s first museum dedicated entirely to vaginas launched in the UK in 2019 and opened its doors for the first time on November 16 following a £50,000 crowdfunding campaign.

It aims to educate and raise awareness of vaginal and vulval health and fight stigmas.

Its founder describes it as “the world’s first bricks and mortar museum dedicated to gynaecological anatomy,” and it features art exhibitions, plays, workshops and comedy nights all centred around vaginas.

Director Florence Schechter decided to set it up in 2017 after discovering Iceland’s Phallological Museum, which houses the world’s largest display of penises, but had no equivalent for vulvas and vaginas.

She said the aim of the museum is to “erase the stigma around the body and gynaecological anatomy” for everyone, regardless of their race, sex or gender.

The Vagina Museum opened at the site in Bethnal Green in March 2022, having moved from Camden Market.

It was using the space in Victoria Park Square alongside entertainment venue, Enter, under a property guardianship scheme.

A spokesperson said it was sad news it had to close so soon and appealed for help in finding new premises.

The free museum, which aimed to spread knowledge and raise awareness of gynaecological anatomy and health, saw more than 40,000 visitors during the 10 months it was open in east London.

Under the guardianship scheme, it was looking after the building which would have otherwise been left empty.

“As a property guardianship, we have always been aware that we may be asked to leave at very short notice,” Florence Schechter, the museum’s director, said.

“We are disappointed that this notice to vacate has come so soon.”

Website | + posts

Related Articles

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Stay Connected

3,500FansLike
3,028FollowersFollow
500FollowersFollow

Latest Articles